Kolkata Boy Shouryya Ray Creates History by Cracking 350-Year-Old Maths Puzzles Set by Sir Isaac Newton

Shouryya Ray, Photo: dailymail.co.uk

A 16-year-old Kolkata boy Shouryya Ray, who arrived Germany 4 years ago, surprised the world by solving two fundamental particle dynamics theories which physicists could calculate only by using powerful computers. Hundreds and thousands of geniuses have already tried their hands and brains on it and Shouryya Ray is the first ever person to have succeeded with flying colors. His solutions will now enable scientists to calculate the flight path of a thrown ball and how it will exactly hit and bounce off a wall for which they had been waiting for more than 350 years.

Shouryya Ray’s journey of solving the maths puzzles started when he heard that the 350 years old puzzle was unsolvable from professors of Dresden University during a school trip. His reaction was “Why not?” “I didn’t believe there couldn’t be a solution” he added and the next what he did, all at the age 16, is history.

He is the son of an engineer who discovered his son’s exceptional intellect after testing his brain with complicated arithmetic problems.

Info Source: www.dailymail.co.uk/

What can we learn from Shouryya Ray?

His accomplishment is greatest which will lead scientist to solve some of the biggest unsolved questions of our time; however, he desires to stay humble and little. He says ‘I’m no genius’ and credits his achievement to ‘hard work in right direction.

Be ready to learn anything. When he arrived Germany at the age of 12, he had no prior knowledge of German but today he is fluent in the language.

Don’t believe in things simply because you are told ‘it is not possible’ by any genius, ask question to yourself and see what answer you receive. Shouryya Ray could accomplish the most difficult task because of the question ‘Why not’ which he posed to himself.

  • Justin Chacko

    Very true, you don’t have to be gifted to be a genius or a savant.
    It’s like how Einstein once quoted..
    “Genius only means an infinite capacity for taking pains.”
    What distinguishes the few like Shouryya Ray is his ability and his unflinching attitude to endure whatever pain he has to, in order to get what he wants and manifest what he believes,thereby transcending to a whole new league of his own in the process.

    • Thanks Justin for your wise words 🙂
      and thanks for the quote:
      “Genius only means an infinite capacity for taking pains.”

  • s. gautam

    you have made us (Bengali) proud. I hope further success from you. Become another Jagadish Chardra Bose or Satyendra nath Bose.

    Brother, I am proud of you.

  • immu

    June 21, 2012 13:03:21 It was widely reported by the media last month that 16-year-old Shouryya Ray had solved a problem first posed by Sir Isaac
    Newton over 350 years ago that has baffled mathematicians ever since. The Indian-born student, who lives in
    eastern Germany and was conducting an
    internship at Technische Universität
    Dresden, was hailed as a genius for working out two fundamental particle
    dynamics equations that previously could only be approximated using computers
    with partial solutions. Ray’s solutions
    allegedly allowed for exact calculation of a
    projectile’s trajectory under gravity and
    subject to air resistance. In layman’s
    terms, an object’s flight path could now be calculated and predictions made about
    how the item would collide with and
    ricochet off a barrier. As it turns out, Ray did not solve
    Newton’s 300-year-old puzzle — because
    the problem never actually existed.

  • imran

    June 21, 2012 13:03:21 It was widely reported by the media last month that 16-year-old Shouryya Ray had solved a problem first posed by Sir Isaac
    Newton over 350 years ago that has baffled mathematicians ever since. The Indian-born student, who lives in
    eastern Germany and was conducting an
    internship at Technische Universität
    Dresden, was hailed as a genius for working out two fundamental particle
    dynamics equations that previously could only be approximated using computers
    with partial solutions. Ray’s solutions
    allegedly allowed for exact calculation of a
    projectile’s trajectory under gravity and
    subject to air resistance. In layman’s
    terms, an object’s flight path could now be calculated and predictions made about
    how the item would collide with and
    ricochet off a barrier. As it turns out, Ray did not solve
    Newton’s 300-year-old puzzle — because
    the problem never actually existed. “The misunderstanding starts here
    already — Newton did not ‘pose a
    problem,’” Jürgen Voigt, a math professor at TU Dresden, told The Huffington Post in
    an email. “He stated that the motion of a
    body under the influence of gravity and
    friction in the air is governed by a certain
    differential equation. Meanwhile, the
    classical theory of ordinary differential equations yields that this equation can be
    solved, and that the solution can be
    represented in a certain form — a series.” “Classical,” Voigt notes, means that the
    theory is contained in textbooks, and is
    presented in second- or third-year
    courses at the university. Voigt and his colleague at TU Dresden, Professor Ralph Chill, published a four- page report June 4 in which they attempted to contextualize Ray’s work
    and compare it with results presented in
    preexisting literature. Voigt emphasized to HuffPost that Ray
    was deserving of the research award he
    received, and that the student’s work
    should be appreciated from the
    perspective that he is a 16-year-old high
    school student using a kind of mathematics far beyond high-school level. That said, Ray’s alleged solutions were
    “not endorsed by experts in the field who
    should have been involved in the
    evaluation of the work,” Voigt and Chill
    wrote in their published comments on the young man’s work . Furthermore, his steps were largely already known to
    experts. Voigt said he did not know how the
    public was made to believe that a long-
    standing problem had been solved. “The point is not that something is
    missing in Ray’s analysis, but rather that
    there was no ‘problem posed by
    Newton,’ and that the methods used by
    Ray are exceptional and remarkable for a
    high-school student, but standard for professional mathematicians,” Voigt said.